Pick a Quick Pickle

Pickling can be just that—a pickle. True pickling is an ancient miracle for food preservation, but involves a drawn-out fermentation process requiring canning equipment, sterilization procedures and a whole lotta waiting around. Kudos to you if that’s up your alley, but the truth is, some of us simply don’t have the time or patience to be as DIY-savvy as our worldly ancestors.

So if you’re a little fickle about pickling, we understand. But did you know that there’s a fast and easy way to preserve and chill those fresh garden veggies without having to wear a lab coat?

Allow us to introduce quick pickling for those of you not ready to go all in. Where science meets cool foodie niche.

  Fresh produce, spices, vinegar and some spice rack creativity will get you ready for quick pickling.

Fresh produce, spices, vinegar and some spice rack creativity will get you ready for quick pickling.

1. Pick your pickle

Although cucumbers are the most common for pickling, you can pickle almost any vegetable such as baby carrots (not the bitty mature carrots which you find in packages, but miniature immature ones with the skin still on), shallots, onion, asparagus, cauliflower, green beans, zucchini, okra, and beyond. The fresher and crispier the produce, the better the final product.

2. Prep the potion

The main ingredient in pickle brine is vinegar. White vinegar is most common, but you can also use cider vinegar or wine vinegar, just not balsamic because it’s too syrupy. Combine 1 cup vinegar with 1/2 cup water.

Add a few pinches of good ole NaCl. Salt draws moisture out of the vegetables, and encourages the growth of useful bacteria.

Finally, spice it up. This is where it gets fun. Many "pickling spice" blends are available and work beautifully, but warning, we might judge you for being boring (just kidding). Consider a visit to the bulk aisle at Mountain View Market Co+op, and try making your own blend with mustard seed, dill seed, dry coriander seed, red pepper flakes, bay leaf, black peppercorns or garlic.

Combine all the ingredients in a saucepan, stir to dissolve, and bring to a boil.

Try This: Instead of diluting the vinegar with water, try including a 1/2 cup of white or brown sugar with a dash of cinnamon. Engage those senses!

 Think outside the box (or pickling jar. Fresh carrots, beans and even cauliflower make delicious quick pickles.

Think outside the box (or pickling jar. Fresh carrots, beans and even cauliflower make delicious quick pickles.

3. Prep your veggies

Trim off any inedible pieces of your vegetable (e.g., the ends of green beans or root ends of onions). If you're cutting your vegetables into pieces, make sure they're all about the same size for pickling consistency.

4. Submerge and chill.

Place your vegetables in a clean, dry container.

Glass jars are the best because they won’t absorb any odors from the pickles (here’s to reuse!) and they’re oh-so lovely.

Pour the boiling brine into the jar and submerge the veggies completely (you can add water to bring up the level if needed). Refrigerate for at least one hour and let the brine work its charms. The longer you brine, the tastier the pickle.

Depending on your veggie, quick pickles keep in the fridge for weeks, if not months, meaning constant crunchy snacks galore. So holler, pickling is a pickle no longer! Pickle that! Pickle!

Pickle seasoning inspiration

Need a bit of quick pickle inspiration? Check out these seasoning recipes.

 Crushed red pepper flakes give these pickled veggies a fiery kick!

Crushed red pepper flakes give these pickled veggies a fiery kick!

 

 

 

 

Spicy Chimichurri Pickled Vegetables

Total Time: 1 week

Servings: makes 1 quart; 6 servings

Make these pickles from any sturdy veggies on hand for a zesty accompaniment to grilled meats, burgers, chili and stews.

Ingredients

  • 1 pound mixed vegetables, washed and cut into bite-sized pieces (try cauliflower, bell peppers, onion, carrots, green beans, or other sturdy vegetables)
  • 1 cup red wine vinegar
  • 1 lemon, juiced
  • 2 tablespoons white sugar
  • 1 teaspoon crushed red pepper flakes
  • 1 teaspoon ground coriander
  • 2 teaspoons salt
  • 1 teaspoon black pepper
  • 2 tablespoons fresh oregano, roughly chopped
  • 3 tablespoons fresh parsley, roughly chopped
  • 6-8 whole garlic cloves, peeled

Preparation

  1. Place the garlic cloves, oregano, and parsley in the bottom of a one-quart jar. Pack the rest of the vegetables tightly into the jar.
  2. In a saucepan, mix the vinegar, lemon juice, sugar, chili flakes, coriander, salt, and pepper and bring to a boil to make a brine. Remove from heat and pour the hot brine over the vegetables. Add hot water until the liquid covers the vegetables. Let cool, then put the lid on tightly and place in the refrigerator. Allow the vegetables to pickle for about a week, shaking the jar occasionally.

Serving Suggestion

These spicy pickled vegetables complement grilled meats, burgers, hearty chili and stews, accompanied by a good craft beer. Try adding them to an antipasto platter or relish tray for extra kick.

Nutritional Information

45 calories, 0 g. fat, 0 mg. cholesterol, 135 mg. sodium, 10 g. carbohydrate, 2 g. fiber, 2 g. protein

 

 Sweet and tangy Bread and Butter Pickles are a summertime delight!

Sweet and tangy Bread and Butter Pickles are a summertime delight!

Bread and Butter Pickles

Total Time: 15-30 minutes + 24 hours in the refrigerator

Servings: 48

Try these tangy-sweet pickles on a tuna sandwich or chopped in a tartar sauce for sautéed fish fillets.

Ingredients

  • 2 1/2 pounds pickling cucumbers or other small cucumbers, cut into 1/8- to 1/4-inch-thick slices (about 9 cups)
  • 1 tablespoon pickling spice
  • 1 tablespoon turmeric
  • 3 cups distilled white vinegar or cider vinegar
  • 3 cups water
  • 1 1/2 cups sugar
  • 1 tablespoon plus 1 teaspoon sea salt

Equipment

6 pint-size (2-cup) canning jars or similar-size tempered-glass or heatproof-plastic containers with lids

Preparation

  1. Divide cucumber slices among 6 pint-size (2-cup) canning jars or similar-size tempered-glass or heatproof-plastic containers with lids. Add 1/2 teaspoon pickling spice and 1/2 teaspoon turmeric to each jar.
  2. Combine vinegar, 3 cups water, sugar and salt in a large saucepan. Bring to a boil and stir until the sugar and salt dissolve. Boil for 2 minutes. Remove from the heat.
  3. Carefully fill jars (or containers) with brine to within 1/2 inch of the rim, covering the cucumbers completely. (Discard any leftover brine.)
  4. Place the lids on the jars (or containers). Refrigerate for at least 24 hours before serving. Store in the refrigerator for up to 1 month.

Serving Suggestion

Try these tangy-sweet bread-and-butter pickles on a tuna sandwich or chopped in a tartar sauce for sautéed fish fillets.

Nutritional Information

7 calories; 0 g fat ( 0 g sat , 0 g mono ); 0 mg cholesterol; 1 g carbohydrates; 1 g added sugars; 0 g protein; 0 g fiber; 27 mg sodium; 38 mg potassium.


This tutorial is courtesy of strongertogether.coop Check them out for more delicious recipes, easy DIYs and information about food co-ops. 

Spicy Chimichurri Pickled Vegetables recipe is courtesy of strongertogether.coop

Bread and Butter Pickles recipe is by EatingWell.com