Posts tagged co-op ends
Five Fab Facts about Co+ops

We think co-ops are fabulous. Cooperation is, after all, a word that implies people working together towards the same end, mutually benefiting one another and the larger community. Both economically beneficial and socially responsible, these community-minded businesses make the world a better place—and that’s a beautiful thing. Here are five fab reasons to celebrate co-ops: 

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Board of Directors: Co-op End #4

We are so fortunate to live in a region that is diverse—culturally, linguistically, and geographically! Not only do we live close to Mexico and have many local residents who identify with that culture, but we also have native nations located in our midst, many resident immigrants from abroad, and a university that has long welcomed students and professors from all over the world.

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Board of Directors: Co-op End #6

When asked to write a newsletter article in a series about our ends, I was excited to choose #6, which addresses our local and regional food system. My hope in contributing to this series of articles is to bring our shared Co-op “ends” to life. In case you are wondering, our ends are a list of six “end results” we would like to see for our store and community. Some are really ambitious, but I am proud to say we are doing tangible things to address all of them! To me, that is what the Co-op is all about.

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Board of Directors: Co-op Ends #3

The Mountain View Market Co-Op has been sustaining itself for 40 years now, ensuring the health and well-being of our members/owners and the community. Sustainable living and sustainable business practices are an important part of being a member/owner of a food cooperative. Food co-ops practice sustainability by supporting local farmers and local vendors. From the very beginning food co-ops have been buying local, organic, and fair trade. 

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The History of Mountain View Market Co-op

In 1975 on the NMSU campus, a group of health-conscious students decided to pool their resources and create a buying club so they could purchase whole foods at bulk prices.  Together, they could order enough to make it worthwhile for the nearby Tucson Co-operative Warehouse to send a truck over to Las Cruces. They determined what items they would like and ordered in bulk quantities and case lots, then divided them accordingly. 

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